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compassion

The Tender Compassion of God

Blog Published: April 23, 2009

From the Canticle of Zechariah prayed during Morning Prayer of the Liturgy of the Hours …

A Prayer in Times of Violence and Tragedy

Blog Published: April 17, 2007

Let us take a moment of silence and hold in our hearts the Virginia Tech community…

Compassion

Blog Published: December 2, 2009

Today’s Gospel reading (Matthew 15:29-37) is a powerful story of Jesus healing people one after the other. Scripture tells us that Jesus simply went up a mountain and sat down. That’s all he did.

Go get 'em!

Blog Published: October 27, 2014

Need a Monday morning pick-me-up? Saint Paul rocks it out with an inspiring message to the community of Ephesus ... and to us!

Join the Convent, See the World

Blog Published: May 17, 2008

One of the first things I learned when I became attached to my nuns, the IHM Sisters, was that we are a dynamic group. We are always moving — scoping this ministry or prayer opportunity in one place; going by plane, train, automobile, bicycle, or one’s own two feet to attend to the needs of people and God’s creation in another place ...

The Good You

Blog Published: October 3, 2011

Today’s liturgical readings call us to remember and to live today the story of the Good Samaritan in Luke 10:25-37. We all know the gist of the story. A traveler is violently attacked and left for dead, passersby avoid the person, but then the least likely of them stops and tenderly cares for the person.

Epic fail with a side of compassion

Blog Published: May 25, 2012

Recently, I went on a long run. And it was REALLY long. Twenty miles, to be exact, the longest run of my training. It started out great–and then, around mile 13, I had an unfortunate encounter ...

A Nun

On this day, and every day

Blog Published: October 11, 2010

Sunday’s gospel reading was the story of the Samaritan who returned to Jesus reminding me of course of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:30-37). The story is well known, but the implication for our lives is sometimes forgotten.